BJR publishes BSCI/BSCCT and BSTI consensus statement on reporting incidental coronary, aortic valve and cardiac calcification on non-gated thoracic CT

 

Consensus statement by the British Society of Cardiovascular Imaging/British Society of Cardiovascular Computated Tomography and the British Society of Thoracic Imaging

 

BJR,the flagship research journal of the British Institute of Radiology, has published a Guidelines and Recommendations article entitled “Reporting incidental coronary, aortic valve and cardiac calcification on non-gated thoracic computed tomography, a consensus statement from the BSCI/BSCCT and BSTI” by Michelle Claire Williams and colleagues.

 

Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in the western world, with coronary artery disease accounting for >10% of all deaths in the UK in 2017. Early detection of coronary artery disease can significantly reduce future coronary events and lead to a reduction in morbidity and mortality.

 

The aim of this joint guideline from the British Society of Cardiovascular Imaging/British Society of Cardiac Computed Tomography (BSCI/BSCCT) and British Society of Thoracic Imaging (BSTI) is to provide guidance for radiologists for reporting incidental coronary and cardiac calcification on routine thoracic CT performed for non-cardiac indications without electrocardiogram gating. The article recommends the reporting of coronary artery calcification (CAC) when visualised on all CT scans, provides guidance on how to classify the severity of CAC on a per patient basis, and aims to increase the awareness of the prognostic implications of CAC.

 

Access the article here: https://doi.org/10.1259/bjr.20200894

 

Notes for Editors

BJR article information

Title: Reporting incidental coronary, aortic valve and cardiac calcification on non-gated thoracic computed tomography, a consensus statement from the BSCI/BSCCT and BSTI

 

Authors: Michelle Claire Williams, Ausami Abbas, Erica Tirr, Shirjel Alam, Edward Nicol, James Shambrook, Matthias Schmitt, Gareth Morgan Hughes, James Stirrup, Ben Holloway, Deepa Gopalan, Aparna Deshpande, Jonathan Weir-McCall, Bobby Agrawal, Jonathan C L Rodrigues, Adrian J B Brady, Giles Roditi, Graham Robinson and Russell Bull

 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1259/bjr.20200894

 

Abstract:

Incidental coronary and cardiac calcification are frequent findings on non-gated thoracic computed tomography (CT). We recommend that the heart is reviewed on all CT scans where it is visualised. Coronary artery calcification is a marker of coronary artery disease and it is associated with an adverse prognosis on dedicated cardiac imaging and on non-gated thoracic CT performed for non-cardiac indications, both with and without contrast. We recommend that CAC is reported on all non-gated thoracic CT using a simple patient-based score (none, mild, moderate, severe). Furthermore, we recommend that reports include recommendations for subsequent management, namely the assessment of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and, if the patient has chest pain, assessment as per standard guidelines. In most cases this will not necessitate additional investigations. Incidental aortic valve calcification may also be identified on non-gated thoracic CT and should be reported, along with ancillary findings such as aortic root dilation. Calcification may occur in other parts of the heart including mitral valve/annulus, pericardium and myocardium, but in many cases these are an incidental finding without clinical significance.

 

About BJR

BJRis the flagship journal of the British Institute of Radiology. It is an international, multi-disciplinary journal covering the clinical and technical aspects of medical imaging, radiotherapy, oncology, medical physics, radiobiology and the underpinning sciences.BJRis essential reading for radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, radiotherapists, radiographers and radiobiologists.

 

Dating back to 1896,BJR’s history is radiology’s history, and the journal has featured some landmark papers such as the first description of CT "Computerized transverse axial tomography" by Godfrey Hounsfield in 1973. A valuable historical resource, the completeBJRarchive has been digitized from 1896.

 

The Editorial Board ofBJRfeatures a panel of international experts covering clinical radiology, radiation oncology, radiotherapy, radiobiology and medical physics. Our Editorial Board members provide their expertise and guidance in shaping the content and direction of the journal.

 

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The British Institute of Radiology is an international membership organisation for everyone working in imaging, radiation oncology and the underlying sciences.

 

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BJR publishes BSCI/BSCCT and BSTI consensus statement

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